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Great Lakes Water Life Photo Gallery

Fish

Perch

  

Family: Percidae - Perches

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Family Profile

Distribution and Habitat

N=Native, I=Introduced (exotic), X=Extinct, P=Extirpated

Image/Link Scientific Name Common Name Lake Superior Lake Michigan

Lake Huron

Lake Erie Lake Ontario Habitat
Family: Percidae perches            
western sand darter Ammocrypta clara western sand darter   N       river, tributaries only
eastern sand darter Ammocrypta pellucida eastern sand darter       N   river
greenside darter Etheostoma blenniodes greenside darter   N N N N stream/creek/river
rainbow darter Etheostoma caeruleum rainbow darter   N N N N stream/creek/river, tributaries only
bluntnose darter Etheostoma chlorosomum bluntnose darter   ?       stream/creek, tributaries only
Iowa darter Etheostoma exile Iowa darter N N N N N stream/creek/river/littoral
fantail darter Etheostoma flabellare fantail darter N N N N N stream/creek
least darter Etheostoma microperca least darter N N N N N stream/creek, tributaries only
Johnny darter Etheostoma nigrum Johnny darter N N N N N stream/creek/river/littoral
tesselated darter Etheostoma olmstedi tesselated darter         N stream/creek/river
orangethroat darter Etheostoma spectabile orangethroat darter       N   stream/creek, tributaries only
banded darter Etheostoma zonale banded darter   N       stream/creek/river, tributaries only
ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus ruffe I          

yellow perch

Perca flavescens yellow perch N N N N N stream/creek/river/littoral
logperch Percina caprodes logperch N N N N N stream/creek/river/littoral
channel darter Percina copelani channel darter     N N N river/littoral
gilt darter Percina evides gilt darter       P   stream/creek/river, tributaries only
blackside darter Percina maculata blackside darter   N N N N stream/creek/river
slenderhead darter Percina phoxocephala slenderhead darter   N       stream/creek/river, tributaries only
river darter Percina shumardi river darter   N N N   river
sauger Stizostedion canadense sauger N N N N N river/littoral

walleye

Stizostedion vitreum vitreum walleye N N N N N river/littoral
blue pike Stizostedion vitreum galucum blue pike       X X river/littoral, open water

Table modified from "The Life of the Lakes: A Guide to the Great Lakes Fishery" MI Sea GRant Extension, Michigan State University.

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Species Profiles

Ammocrypta clara - western sand darter

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Usually in sandy bottom of larger rivers. Sand darters are nearly transparent in life, but become opaque upon preservation. Feed on aquatic insects (chironomids, tiny crustaceans, small insect larvae ). Length to 6 cm.

western sand darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

 

Ammocrypta pellucida - eastern sand darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Listed as a threatened species in Michigan. Sand darters are nearly transparent in life, but become opaque upon death and preservation. Feed on small benthos. Length to 7 cm

easter sand darter drawing
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

1 of 4 eastern sand darter photos in the UM collection

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

 

Etheostoma blennioides - greenside darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Feed on midges and crustaceans. Length to 9 cm.

greenside darter drawing
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

1 of 6 greenside darter photos in the UM collection

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

1 of 2 greenside darter photos in the VA collection (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

 

Etheostoma caeruleum - rainbow darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Rainbow darters are often used as biological indicators because they do not tolerate most forms of water pollution. Ordinarily on gravel substrate in creeks. Young rainbow darters eat mostly copepods and small midge larvae. As they grow into adulthood, the size of their food gets larger and they eat a greater variety of items including midge, caddisfly, mayfly, and stonefly larvae; waterfleas; water mites; young crayfish; and snails. They also eat the developing eggs of minnows and other darters. Length to 7 cm.

rainbow darter (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.EPA GLNPO - Great Lakes Fish

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Etheostoma chlorosomum - bluntnose darter

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

In quiet, muddy waters. Feed on benthos. Length to 5 cm.

1 of 2 bluntnose darter photos in the UM collection

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

bluntnose darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

 

Etheostoma exile - Iowa darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

On sandy to muddy bottoms near vegetation, in cool lakes and quiet streams. Unlike most darters, Iowa darters prefer still or slow-moving water. In lakes and ponds Iowa darters eat mostly copepods, waterfleas of various sorts, and midge larvae. As they grow they add sideswimmers and larger midge larvae. In streams and rivers Iowa darters eat mostly midge and mayfly larvae and amphipods. Length to 7 cm.

Iowa darter image
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

Iowa darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

 

Etheostoma flabellare - fantail darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Eats midge larvae, isopods, amphipods and other aquatic insects. Length to 8 cm.

fantail darter drawing

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Iowa

fantail darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

Additional Artwork:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

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Etheostoma microperca - least darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Climb in dense vegetation in quiet waters. Least darters eat small food items that include a variety of copepods, waterfleas, midge larvae, and mayfly larvae. Length 4 cm in females, 2.5 cm in males.

1 of 3 least darter photos inthe UM collection

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

least darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

 

Etheostoma nigrum - Johnny darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Johnny darters are among the first fishes to move into new aquatic habitats or to recolonize a stream after a catastrophe. They prefer clear water with sandy or gravely bottoms and slow or still waters, but they do very well in moderately turbid (cloudy), moving water. They seem to tolerate many kinds of water pollution, more so then other darters species. Young Johnny darters eat mostly small copepods and waterfleas. As they grow, they add larger waterfleas, midge larvae, mayfly larvae, caddisfly larvae and sometimes sideswimmers to their diet. Length to 7 cm. Males grow faster and reach a larger size than the females do.

Johnny darter (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

 

Etheostoma olmstedi - tesselated darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Feed on small benthos. Length to 7 cm.

Tesselated darter image
Inland Fishes of New York

tesselated darter (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

 

Etheostoma spectabile - orangethroat darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology Feed on small benthos (chironomids, tiny crustaceans, small insect larvae ). Length to 7 cm.

orangethroat darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Iowa

1 of 3 orangethroat darter photos in the UM collection

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

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Etheostoma zonale - banded darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

On riffles, particularly in algae and other vegetation. Feed on aquatic insects. Length to 6 cm.

banded darter drawing

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Iowa

banded darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

Additional artwork:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

 

Gymnocephalus cernuus - ruffe

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteFact Sheet - WI Sea Grant
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteMN Sea Grant
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA sitePA Sea Grant
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteProfile - WI Sea Grant
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - USGS Nonidigenous Aquatic Species Database
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteBibliographic - Clearinghouse
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteSGNIS

GLANSIS

From Eurasia; introduced to western Lake Superior in ballast water of shipping tankers. Slowly spreading to lower lakes. Feed on aquatic invertebrates. Length to 25 cm.

ruffe photo

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteWI Sea Grant

ruffe photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

Additional Photos:
GLERL Waterlife Photo Gallery
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.USGS Nonidigenous Aquatic Species Database
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteSGNIS
Globe icon indicates a link to a non-NOAA siteGLNPO - Great Lakes Invasives
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

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Perca flavescens - yellow perch

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Interactive Fishtank - Great Lakes Fishery Commission
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteProfile - WI Sea Grant
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fish of Indiana
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Identifying Michigan Sport Fish - MI DNR
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Great Lakes Field Guide - A Superior Adventure - Bell Museum
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Schools found in clear waters with moderate vegetation and a sand/gravel or mud/silt bottom often suspended in the middle of the water column. Larval yellow perch commonly eat copepods, waterfleas, and other small crustaceans. Juveniles quickly begin to include bigger items such as aquatic insect larvae and larval fish. By the end of their first growing season, perch are including small fish, crayfish, leeches, and snails in their diet. Adults continue to eat all of these items, but include more fish as they get larger. Length to 37 cm. Female yellow perch grow faster and reach an overall bigger size than males do. Record=14.5 inches.

yellow perch drawing

GLERL Waterlife Photo Gallery

Yellow Perch Photo

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteWI Sea Grant

Additional drawings/artwork:
GLERL Waterlife Photo Gallery
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.GLFC Great Lakes Fishtank
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.US Fish and Wildlife Service
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fish of Indiana
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

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Percina caprodes - logperch

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of NewYork
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteProfile - Madison JASON Wisconsin Sea Grant

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Found at depths to 30m. Food search often assisted by turning over stones with their long, pointed snout. Juvenile logperch eat a mixture of tiny organisms such as rotifers, copepods, and waterfleas. As logperch grow, they incorporate a greater variety of small aquatic creatures. They eat mostly aquatic insects (especially mayfly and midge larvae), but include young snails, waterfleas, leeches, and fish eggs (including their own) when available. Length to 18 cm. Our largest darter.

logperch drawing

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteMadison JASON Wisconsin Sea Grant

logperch (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

Additional Drawings/Artwork:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of NewYork

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

 

Percina copelandi - channel darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Endangered in MI. Living in the main lakes and in deep current of lower parts of tributaries. Feed on small aquatic invertebrates. Length to 6 cm.

channel darter drawing
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

1 of 2 channel darter photos in the UM collection

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

channel darter (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

 

Percina evides - gilt darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Breeding males are brilliantly colored; the back of the fish and the lateral blotches become an intense, iridescent blue-green, while the ventral portions of the body and head, the spinous dorsal fin and the area between the blotches become brilliant yellow and orange, the latter sometimes punctuated with reddish dots. Important indicators of degraded water quality. They are especially sensitive to sediment loading and probably to organic loading from sewage effluents. Gilt darters are diurnal feeders, feeding most heavily in the afternoon hours. Opportunistic feeding according to the availability of accessable surface-dwelling insects. Juveniles eat caddisfly larvae As caddisfly larvae decreased in relative importance in the diet, midge and black fly larvae increased. Mayfly naiads were most important in the diet of very young darters and in the diet of pre-spawning adults. Length to 7 cm.

gilt darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

gilt darter (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

 

Percina maculata - blackside darter

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Usually in weak currents of streams; in midwater when young and often when adult. Young blackside darters begin by eating mostly small crustaceans, like waterfleas and copepods, but they switch quickly to insect larvae. Adults eat a greater variety of insect larvae, including mayflies, midges, and caddisflies. They also include a small amount of plant matter, other insect larvae, waterfleas and other crustaceans, fish eggs, and even larval fish. Length to 11cm.

blackside darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

blackside darter (photo credit Bob Jenkins and Noel Burkhead)

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

1 of 3 blackside darter photos in the UM collection

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

 

Percina phoxocephala - slenderhead darter

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Feed on aquatic insects (dipteran, mayfly and caddisfly larvae). Length to 8 cm.

 

slenderhead darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

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Percina shumardi - river darter

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Endangered in MI. Generally in deeper waters of larger streams, on soft to gravelly bottoms. Feed on aquatic insect nymphs. Length to 8 cm.

river darter photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

Stizostedion canadense (Alt Sander canadensis) - sauger

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fish of Indiana
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Listed as threatened in Michigan. Feeds on fish, crayfish, and insects. Length to 50 cm; weight to over 3 lbs.

sauger drawing

GLERL Waterlife Photo Gallery

sauger photo

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota

Additional Drawings/Artwork:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.US Fish and Wildlife Service
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fish of Indiana
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

 

Stizostedion vitreum vitreum (Alt Sander vitreus) - walleye

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Interactive Fishtank - Great Lakes Fishery Commission
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteProfile - WI Sea Grant
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fish of Indiana
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Identifying Michigan Sport Fish - MI DNR
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Great Lakes Field Guide - A Superior Adventure - Bell Museum
Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteScientific Profile - Fishes of Wisconsin
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Walleye prefer slightly turbid water with reefs, gravel shoals, rock or other hard bottoms. Walleye are piscivores (fish-eaters) and will eat any species of fish they can catch and swallow. Larval and young juvenile walleye consume copepods, waterfleas, and small insect larvae, but quickly add larval fish to their diets. Adults prefer emerald shiners, gizzard shad, alewife and rainbow smelt. Walleye are light sensitive and feed primarily at night. Length typically to 75 cm; weight to 16 lbs. Record = 33 inches.

walleye drawing

GLERL Waterlife Photo Gallery

walleye photo from Shedd Aquarium

Bird icon indicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA siteWI Sea Grant

Additional drawings/artwork:
GLERL Waterlife Photo Gallery
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.GLFC Great Lakes Fishtank
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.GLIN - TEACH
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fish of Indiana
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.US Fish and Wildlife Service
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York

Additional Photos:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Fishes of Minnesota
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.EPA GLNPO - Great Lakes Fish
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.University of Michigan Museum of Zoology
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.The Virtual Aquarium at Virginia Tech

 

Stizostedion vitreum galucum (Alt Sander glaucus)- blue pike

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Profile - Inland Fishes of New York

Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Scientific Profile - University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Extinct since 1960s. Once caught by commercial fishermen especially in deeper, cooler E Lake Erie. Diagnosed by life history traits and a combination of walleye and sauger characteristics. Hybridized with walleyes. (Blue walleyes in Lake Huron and interior lakes of Ontario and Manitoba, with smaller eye and yellow lower fins, are walleyes, not blue pikes.) Fed on fishes and invertebrates. Length to 36 cm; weight to about 2 lbs.

blue pike drawing

GLERL Waterlife Photo Gallery

Additional Artwork:
Globe icon indicates link to a non-NOAA site.Inland Fishes of New York State

Bird iconIndicates a link to a non-GLERL NOAA website.
Globe iconIndicates a link to a non-NOAA website or content not generated by NOAA. NOAA is not responsible for the accuracy of content. Please check Privacy and Use Policies of the destination site.
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